8 Powerful Strategies For How to Fix The Shanks and Master Your Swing!”

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Are you struggling with the dreaded shanks in your golf game? Have no idea how to fix the shanks, Don’t worry, you’re not alone. In this article, we’ll guide you on how to fix the shanks and improve your game.

First, let’s understand the causes. One common cause is lagging the hosel, where the clubface opens excessively in the backswing. Another cause is hands moving too far away from your body during the downswing. Lastly, standing too far away from the ball at address can lead to shanks.

Yes, the shanks in golf can be fixed. To learn how to fix the shanks, focus on maintaining a light grip pressure, keeping the clubhead low to the ground, and leading with the hands through impact. Additionally, practicing pitch and chip shots with proper technique can help eliminate this destructive shot from your golf game

 

Key Takeaways How To Fix The Shanks

  • Lagging the hosel can cause shanks, so actively close the clubface on the downswing and keep the clubface looking at the ball during the takeaway.
  • If your hands move too far away from your body during the downswing, work on keeping them closer to your body, even if it means slowing down your swing.
  • Standing too far away from the ball at address can lead to shanks, so stand closer to the ball and let your body move backwards during the downswing.
  • To diagnose the cause of your shanks, video your swing in slow motion and analyse the impact.

Understanding the Golf Shank

To understand the shank, it’s important to know that it occurs when the golf ball impacts the hosel instead of the clubface. The shank is considered the most destructive shot in golf, as the ball shoots off to the right at a 45 degree angle. This undesirable outcome can be frustrating for any golfer looking to achieve mastery.

The shank is typically caused by the hosel coming into contact with the golf ball during the downswing. Common causes include lagging the hosel, hands moving too far away from the body, and standing too far away from the ball at address.

To fix lagging the hosel, focus on actively closing the clubface on the downswing. For hands moving too far away from the body, work on keeping them closer during the downswing. And to address standing too far away from the ball, stand closer to the ball to ensure a proper swing path.

Identifying the Causes Of The Shank

To identify what’s causing your shanks, you can start by analysing your swing in slow motion and observing the impact. A shank occurs when the hosel of the club comes into contact with the golf ball instead of the clubface. It’s considered the most annoying shot in golf.

Common causes of shanks include lagging the hosel, hands moving too far away from the body, and standing too far away from the ball at address.

Lagging the hosel can cause the hosel to hit the ball first. To fix this, actively close the club face on the downswing and keep the clubface looking at the ball during the takeaway.

Hands moving too far away from the body during the downswing can also cause shanks. To sort this, work on keeping your hands closer to your body during the downswing.

2. Stand farther from the ball

Shanks on the course for high-handicap players can be scary. Most of the time they are caused by incorrect concepts. There are many ways to correct a shank, however, standing a little further away from the ball and keeping your weight on your heels the entire swing is the easiest way to correct it on the fly. -Bill Moretti, Austin, Texas

https://golf.com/instruction/get-rid-of-shanks-top-100-roundtable/

Lagging the Hosel Fix

how to fix the shanks

To fix lagging the hosel and prevent shanks, actively close the clubface on the downswing and maintain focus on keeping the clubface looking at the ball during the takeaway. Lagging the hosel can lead to shanks, which are considered the most destructive shot in golf.

Opening the clubface excessively in the backswing can cause the hosel to hit the ball first, resulting in a shank. To correct this, practice actively closing the clubface during the downswing. This can be achieved through drills that focus on consciously rotating the hands and wrists, ensuring the clubface remains square at impact.

Additionally, maintaining a strong visual connection between the clubface and the ball during the takeaway will help prevent the clubface from opening too much and causing a shank. By implementing these techniques, golfers can improve their golf game and avoid the frustration of the dreaded shank.

Hands Positioning Fix

When your hands move too far away from your body during the downswing, it can result in shanks. To fix this issue, you need to focus on your hands positioning. Here are three key steps to help you correct your hands positioning and eliminate shanks:

  1. Maintain Connection: Keep your hands connected to your body throughout the swing. This means avoiding any excessive separation or extension. By keeping your hands close to your body, you’ll have better control and avoid hitting the ball with the toe of the club.
  2. Find the Right Distance: Stand at a proper distance from the ball at address. Make sure you aren’t reaching too far or standing too close. Finding the right distance will allow you to make a more natural and fluid swing, preventing your hands from moving away from the ball.
  3. Follow the Target Line: During your downswing, focus on keeping your hands on the target line. This will help you maintain the correct path and hit the ball solidly. Avoid any lateral movements or excessive hand rotation that can lead to shanks.

Address Positioning Fix

Maintaining the correct address positioning is crucial in fixing the shanks and improving your golf swing.

When addressing the ball, make sure to stand at a comfortable distance from the ball, neither too close nor too far away. Standing too far away can cause you to reach for the ball on the downswing, resulting in the clubface moving further out and the heel hitting the ball. To fix this, stand closer to the ball, forcing your body to move backward during the downswing.

Additionally, tilt your spine more towards the ground, allowing for a steeper shoulder turn and higher arm lift. This will help steepen your downswing, move your path more to the left, and keep the hosel further away from the ball.

Practicing these adjustments in your address positioning will help you cure the shanks and improve your swing.

Early Extension Fix

Are you struggling with early extension and looking for ways to get rid of the shanks in your golf swing? Understanding what causes shanking the ball is key to finding a cure for your shanks. Early extension, or thrusting the hips toward the ball during the downswing, is a common cause of hitting a shank.

To fix this issue, focus on the following:

  • Maintain your spine angle throughout the swing to prevent early extension.
  • Engage your core muscles to stabilize your body and prevent excessive hip movement.
  • Practice drills that promote proper sequencing of the downswing, such as starting the downswing with your lower body before rotating your upper body.

Additional Fixes and Drills

To further improve your golf shot and prevent shanks, try incorporating these additional fixes and drills into your practice routine.

First, focus on swinging easy. When you swing too hard, it can cause the club to move across the target line, leading to shanks. By swinging with less effort, you can maintain control and prevent the club from veering off course.

Additionally, work on understanding what causes the shanks. Analyze your swing to identify any flaws or inconsistencies that may be contributing to the issue. This knowledge will help you make targeted adjustments and learn how to cure the shanks.

Finally, practice drills that promote a consistent golf swing. Develop a smooth and fluid motion, ensuring that the club is moving across the correct path.

 

Addressing the Ball on the Heel

To address the issue of addressing the ball on the heel, focus on standing closer to the ball at address to ensure a more centered impact. This will help prevent shanking the ball and improve your overall ball striking consistency.

Here are three key tips to help you address the ball on the heel:

  • Position yourself with your feet shoulder-width apart, allowing for a stable base.
  • Align the ball with the inside of your left heel (for right-handed players) to encourage a more inside-out swing path.
  • Maintain a slight knee flex and tilt your upper body slightly towards the target to promote a more centered strike.

The Two Ball Drill

Try the Two Ball Drill to help fix your shanks and improve your ball striking consistency. This is a great drill for golfers who tend to miss the ball with the hosel or have a tendency to come over the top in their swing.

To perform the drill, set up two golf balls about a foot apart from each other. Take your normal address position and swing, aiming to hit the first ball without touching the second one. This drill helps you to shallow the golf club and promotes a more on-plane swing.

By focusing on hitting the ball without contacting the second one, you train your body to swing more from the inside, preventing the heel of the club from hitting the ball.

Practice this drill regularly and swing in slow motion to ensure proper technique and ball striking.

FAQ For How To Fix The Shanks

Q: How can I fix my golf shank?

A: One of the best ways to fix a golf shank is to work on your swing path and clubface control. You can also try using drills and exercises specifically designed to fix shanks. Consulting with a golf instructor or a top 100 teacher can also help you diagnose and cure your golf shanks.

Q: Can I cure my shanks on my own without a golf instructor?

A: While it is possible how to fix the shanks on your own with enough practice and dedication, consulting with a golf instructor can greatly expedite the process. A qualified golf instructor can provide personalized guidance and feedback to help you address the root causes of your shanks and develop a consistent golf swing.

Q: Do shanks only happen with irons, or can they occur with other clubs?

A: While shanks are commonly associated with irons, they can also occur with other clubs, including wedges and even the driver. The key to preventing shanks across all clubs is to focus on proper swing mechanics and clubface control.

Q: How can I prevent shanking shots around the green?

A: Shanking shots around the green can be particularly frustrating. To prevent shanks on these delicate shots, focus on maintaining a light grip pressure, keeping the clubhead low to the ground, and leading with the hands through impact. Additionally, practicing pitch and chip shots with proper technique can help develop confidence and consistency.

Can The Shanks Be Considered a Common Golf Swing Problem?

Can the shanks be considered common golf swing problems? Yes, the shanks are indeed one of the most common issues golfers face. It refers to a shot that veers off to the right (for right-handed golfers) abruptly and unexpectedly. Shanks can be frustrating and impact a player’s confidence, so it’s essential to address this problem and work on correcting the swing to improve overall performance.

Conclusion

In conclusion, by understanding the causes of the shanks, We learn how to fix the shanks and by implementing the fixes and drills provided in this article, you can effectively eliminate this destructive shot from your golf game.

Whether it’s lagging the hosel, improper hand positioning, or incorrect address positioning, there are practical tips and techniques to correct each issue.

With practice and consistency, you can improve your swing and enjoy a more consistent and accurate golf game.

So don’t let the shanks hold you back any longer, start implementing these fixes today and see the difference in your game.

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